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50 Great Short Stories

494 N AT H A N I E し H AW T H 0 R N E ways glad t0 100k upon. Come, good sir, let the sun shine 仕 om behind the cloud. First lay aside your black veil: then tell me why you put it on. ' Mr. Hooper's smlle glimmered faintly. "There is an hour to come," said he, "when all of us shall cast aside our veils. Take it not amiss, beloved 0n4 if I wear this piece ofcrape till then. ' "Your words are a mystery, t00 , " returned the young lady. "Take away the veil 仕 om them, at least. ' "Elizabeth, I will," said he, "so far as my vow may suffer me. Know, then, this veil is a type and a symbol, and I am bound t0 wear it ever, b0th ⅲ light and darkness, in solitude and before the gaze 0f multitudes, and as with strangers, SO with my familiar friends. NO mo al eye will see it withdrawn. This dismal shade must separate me 仕 om the world: even you, Elizabeth, can never come behind it! ” 、、 lat grievous affiction hath befallen you," she earnestly mquired, 。、 that you should thus darken your eyes forever?" "lf it be a sign of mourning," replied Mr,. Hooper, "I per- haps, like most 0ther mortals, have sorrows dark enough t0 be typified by a black veil. " "But what if the world will not believe that it is the type 0f an lnnocent sorrow?" urged Elizabeth. "Beloved and respected as you are, there may be whispers, that you hide your face un- der the consclousness Of secret sin. For the sake Of your hOly offce, do away this scandal!" The C010r rose intO her cheeks as she intimated the nature Of the rumors that were already abroad ⅲ the village. But Mr. Hooper's mildness did not forsake him. He even smiled again—that same sad smile, which always appeared like a faint glmmering oflight, proceeding om the obscurity beneath the veil. "lf I hide my face for sorrow, there is cause enough," he merely replied; f'and if I cover it for secret sin, what mo al might not dO the same?" And with this gentle, but unconquerable obstinacy did he resist all her entreaties. At length Elizabeth sat silent. For a few moments she appeared lost ⅲ thought, considermg, probably,

50 Great Short Stories

A G 0 0 D M A N I S H A R D T 0 F IN D 231 She said she thought it was going t0 be a good day for driv- ing, neither t00 h0t nor t00 C014 and she cautioned Bailey that the speed limit was fifty-five miles an hour and that the patrol- men hid themselves behind billboards and small clumps of trees and sped out after you before you had a chance to slow down. She pornted out interesting details ofthe scenery: Stone Mountain; the blue granite that ⅲ some places came up to both sides of the highway; the brilliant red clay banks slightly streaked W1th purple; and the vanous crops that made rows of green lacework on the ground. The trees were 血Ⅱ of silver- white sunlight and the meanest ofthem sparkled. The children were reading com1C magazines and their mother had gone back t0 sleep. "Let's go through Georgia fast SO we won't have t0 0k at it much," John Wesley said. "lf I were a little boy," said the grandmother, "I wouldn't talk about my native state that w . Tennessee has the moun- tains and Georgia has the hills. " "Tennessee isjust a hillbilly dumping ground," JO Wesley said, "and Georgia is a lousy state t00. ' "You said it; ” June Star said. "ln my ume," said the grandmother, folding her 市ⅲ veined fingers, "children were more respectful Of their native states and their parents and everything else. People did right then. Oh 100k at the cute little pickaninny!" she said and pointed to a Negro child standing ⅲ the door 0f a shack. "Wouldn't that make a picture, now?" she asked and they all turned and 100 d at the little Negro out ofthe back window. He waved. "He didn't have any britches on," June Star said. "He probably didn't have any," the grandmother explained. "Little niggers in the country don't have things like we d0. If I could paint, l'd paint that picture," she said. The children exchanged comic books. The grandmother offered to hold the baby and the children's mother passed him over the front seat t0 her. She set him on her knee and bounced him and told him about the thmgs they were passing. She rolled her eyes and screwed up her mouth and stuck her leathery 市ⅲ face into his smooth bland one. Occasionally he

The Canadian Rockies: A History in Photographs

6 THE CANADIAN ROCKIES: A HISTORY PHOTOGRAPHS を , ま をい 物 . ン第′ 1-3 らこ 1 Wilson heard the thunder of The man grven the daunting Rogers was the right man avalanches coming 伝 01 れ the task of finding a route for for the job. He located an mountains above, and asked the CPR through the Rock- acceptable, if hazardous, line one Of the Natives the ies, and the unknown for the rail 、 across source Of the sound. He Selkirk Mountains further Kicking Horse and Rogers replied the avalanches were passes in 1882. For his west, was MaJor A. B. Rogers, an accomplished discovery of Rogers Pass in on snow mountam above rarlway engrneer om the the Selkirks ー the key to the the lake oflittle fishes. United States. 気 h an route ー the CPR a 、 varded Next day, Wilson and the Stoney, Edwin Hunter, rode outlandish n10 us tache, a him a 5000 dollar bonus profane vocabulary, a diet of to the lake. Originally cheque , which Rogers named "Emerald" by raw beans and chewing framed and never cashed. 引 son , this was the first tobacco, and unstoppable Not indestructible, Rogers recorded ViSit tO 、 vhat iS no 、 drive,"HeII's Bells" Rogers died 01 Ⅱ sustained in a 信Ⅱ from his horse in 、 one Of the most colour- known as Lake Louise. lt also marked the beginmng ful characters tO grace the 1889 , while surveying pages of Rockies' history. another railway in the US. Of the connection between One of the men in Major the CPR and the spectacular He was from all reports, scenery of the Rockies; a almost as tough as the Rogers command 、 ' 01 れ WiIson, who packed connectlon 、、 vould mountain landscape he lead to the establishment of supplies for the survey. ln faced in his work. August1882, Wilson was a mountarn tourrsm indus— Rogers drove himself and camped with some Stoney try and Canada's firstthree his men mercilessly hard, Natives at the CO nfluence Of earning from most he super- national parks ・ Vised a respect born out Of the Bow and Pipestone Tom Wilson became a Rivers, near the present S1te fixture in the Canadian fear. But if success 、 h,ras the of Lake Louise village. Rock1es, and something of a measure Of hiS actlons,

アメリカの中学教科書で英語を学ぶ

carried them westward om the time they set sail on August 3 , 1492. After t 、 MO mont S at sea, Columbus's men became restless. Because he feared muti y CoIumbus conc aled from his men the distance they had traveled. Finally, he agreed th t if they did not reach Asia in three days, he would turn back. On the third day, October 12 , they sighted land. CoIumbus mistakenly 数 believed that they had reached lndia, so he called the native people there lndians. ln reality, they were Tainos and he had landed on an 学 island in the Bahamas that he named San Salvador. When Columbus returned to Spain, he brought gold and several Tainos he had kidnapped as slaves. On his three later voyages, he brought more Spanish people to the Caribbean and more enslaved lndians to Spain, changing the lives of both groups forever. 国語表現 Post-Quiz ・ Write down the answer fo 「 each question. ( 少し難問ですが記述式です。日本語でもかまわないですよ ) 理 1 Why did Europeans leave their homes in the 1500s and 1600S to explore and seftle new continents? 科 2 . HOW did the geography of the New World frustrate early European explorers in their attempts tO find a new trade route tO East Asia? 課 3 . げ land routes to Asia had been shorter and safer, would the Age 外 Of Discovery have occurred sooner orlater than it did? 業 35

50 Great Short Stories

THE LOTTERY* BY SHIRLEY JACKSON HE MORNING of June 27th was clear and sunny, with the fresh warmth of a full-summer day; the flowers were blossommg profusely and the grass was richly green. The peo- ple 0f the village began t0 gather ⅲ the square, between the post omce and the bank, around ten o'clock; ⅲ some towns there were so many people that the 1 e t00k two days and had to be started on June 26th, but in this village, where there were only about three hundred people, the whole 10 e t00k less than two hours, SO it could begin at ten 0'c10Ck in the mormng and still be through ⅲ time t0 allow the villagers t0 get home for noon dinner. The children assembled first, ofcourse. Sch001 was recently over for the summer, and the feeling 0f liberty sat uneasily on most ofthem; they tended t0 gather together quietly for a while before they broke into boisterous pl , and their ね lk was still of the classroom and the teacher, 0f b00ks and reprimands. Bobby Martin had already stuffed his pockets Ⅱ 0f stones, and the other boys soon followed his example, selecting the smoothest and roundest stones; B0bby and Harry Jones and Dickie Delacroix—the villagers pronounced this name "Dellacroy"—eventually made a great pile 0f stones ln one corner 0f the square and guarded it against the raids 0f the other boys. The girls st00d aside, talking among themselves looking over their shoulders at the boys, and the very small children rolled ⅲ the dust or clung t0 the hands 0f their older brothers or sisters. om e Ⅳ施′ド

50 Great Short Stories

FATHER WAKES UP THE VILLAGE* BY CLARENCE DAY NE OF the most disgraceful features ofli ⅲ the coun- try, Father often declared, was the general ineffciency and slackness ofsmall village tradesmen. He said he had orig- inally supposed that such men were interested ⅲ business, and that that was why they had opened their shops and sunk c 叩 i ね 1 in them, but no, they never used them for anything but gossip and sleep. They t00k no interest ⅲ civilized ways. Hadn't heard 0f them, probably. He said that of course if he were camping out on the veldt or the tundra, he would expect few conven- iences in the neighborhood and would do his best to forego them, but why should he be confronted with the wilds twenty miles 仕 om NewYork? Usually, when Father talked this way, he was thinking ofice. He strongly objected t0 spending even one day ofhis ⅱた with- out a glass 0f cold water beside his plate at every meal. There was never any diffculty about this ⅲ our home ⅲ the city. A great silver ice-water pitcher st00d on the sideboard all day, and when Father was home its outer surface was frosted with cold. When he had gone to the offce, the ice was allowed to melt sometimes, and the water got warmish, but never in the evenmg, or on Sundays, when Father might want some. He said he liked water, he told us it was one ofNature's best gifts, but he said that like all her gifts it was unfit for human consump- tion unless served in a suitable manner. And the only right way tO serve water was icy COld. 伝。 m 励 e ル , ′′ and ife w ″んん

50 Great Short Stories

T H E L 0 T T E RY 161 the first people settled down t0 make a village here. Every year, after the 10 e Mr. Summers began talkmg again about a new box, but every year the subject was allowed to fade offwithout anything's being done. The black box grew shabbier each year; by now it was no longer completely black but splintered badly along one side tO show the onginal WOOd C010r , and ⅲ some places faded or stained. Mr. Martin and his oldest son, Baxter, held the black box se- curely on the St001 until Mr. Summers had stirred the p 叩 ers thoroughly with his hand. Because so much of the ⅱ加 al had been forgotten or discarded, Mr,. Summers had been successful ⅲ having slips 0f paper substituted for the chips 0f wood that had been used for generations. Chips of W004 Mr. Summers had argued, had been all very well when the village was tiny, but now that the population was more than three hundred and likely tO keep on growrng, it was necessary t0 use something that would fit more easily into the black box. The night before the 10 れ e , Mr. Summers and Mr. Graves made up the slips of paper and put them ⅲ the box, and it was then taken t0 the safe of Mr. Summers' coal company and locked 叩 until Mr. Summers was ready tO take it tO the square next mormng. The rest Of the year, the box was put away, sometrmes one place, sometimes another; it had spent one year ⅲ Mr.. Graves's barn and another year underfoot ⅲ the post omce, and sometlmes it was set on a shelfin the Martin grocery and le 代 there. There was a great deal of fussing to be done before Mr. Summers declared the 10 open. There were the lists t0 make up—of heads 0f families, heads 0f households ⅲ each family, members Of each household ⅲ each family. There was the proper sweanng-in 0f Mr. Summers by the postmaster, as the offcial of the 10 ; at one time, some people remem- bered, there had been a recital of some so performed by the offcial of the 10 e , a perfunctory, tuneless chant that had been rattled 0 duly each year; some people believed that the offcial ofthe lottery used to standjust so when he said or sang it, others believed that he was supposed to walk 明 long the 0- ple, but years and years ago this part of 市 0 ⅱ加 al had been al- lowed to 1 叩 se. There had been, also, a ⅱ加 salute, which the

50 Great Short Stories

404 A RT H U R S C H N I T Z L E R terly he saw more of our friend. Perh 叩 s he can throw some light on the question.' The author stood motionless, gazing steadily into the closed eyes 0f the dead man. His hands, which held his broad- brimmed grey hat, were crossed behind his back. The 20 oth- ers began t0 grow lmpatient, and the merchant went up tO him and cleared his throat. 'Three days ago," observed the author, "I went for a 20- hOurs' walk with him among the hills and vineyards. Would you like to know what he talked about? A trip to Sweden, that he had planned for the summer, a new Rembrandt portfoliojust published by Watson's ⅲ London; and last of all about Santos Dumont. He went intO all sorts of mathematical and scientific details about a dirigible airship, which, to be frank with you, I did not entirely grasp. He certainly was not thinking about death. lt must indeed be true that at a certain age people again stop thinking about it. " The doctor had gone into the adjoimng room. Here he might certainly venture t0 light his cigarette. The sight ofwhite ashes ⅲ the bronze on the writing-table struck him as strange and almost uncanny. He wondered why he was still there at all, as he sat down on the chair by the writing-table. He had the right t0 go as soon as he liked, since he had obviously been sent for as a doctor. For their friendship had nearly come to an end. "At my trme 0f li , " he went on, pursuing his reflection, "it is quite impossible for a man like me t0 keep friends with some- one who has no profession and never has had one. What would he have taken up if he had not been rich? He would probably have turned tO literature: he was very clever. " And he remem- bered many malicious but pointed remarks the dead man had made, more especially about the works oftheir common friend, the author. The author and the merchant came ⅲ . The author assumed an expression 0f disapproval when he saw the doctor sitting at the deserted writing-table with a cigarette ⅲ his hand, which was, however, still unlit, and he closed the door behind him Here, however, they were tO some extent ⅲ another world. "Have you any so れ 0f idea?.. ' ? asked the merchant.

アメリカの中学教科書で英語を学ぶ

4 . Judging from their behavior, what can you infer about the way the Spanish conquistadors viewed the native inhabitants Of the Americas? Post-Quiz Answer Key inferior people in need Of their help. (AIIOW fO 「 personal opinion. ) 4 . The conquistadors seemed to view the native inhabitants as explorers were motivated by the desire tO find a shortcut tO Asia. 3 . The Age of Discovery would have been delayed because many and Asia via the Atlantic Ocean. 2 . The New World blocked possible trade routes between Europe settlement in the New WO d. religious intolerance, and economic difficulties in Europe led tO nations, and new technology led tO exploration. OverpopuIation, 1 . The Renaissance, the Reformation, the development of strong 各設問に対する答を書きなさい。 【 Post - Quiz の日本語訳】 か。 1 . ヨーロッパ人たちは、なぜ 15 世紀や 16 世紀に、母国を去って新大陸を探検し定住したの に見ていたと推測できるだろう。 スペインの征服者たちは、その行動から判断すると、南北アメリカの原住民をどのよう れ早かれ、発見の時代は起こっていたのだろうか。 3 . もしもアジアへの陸路がより短く、より安全なものであったとしても、実際よりも遅か 家をどのように悩ませたのか。 新世界の地理は、東アジアへの新しい商業路を見出そうとする初期のヨーロッパ人探検 4 2 36

アメリカの中学教科書で英語を学ぶ

0 The Sun Although the sun is actually an ordinary star, it is very important to the inhabitants of the Earth. The sun, the closest star to the earth, is the source of virtually all of the earth's energy. lt 100kS so small because it is about 93 million miles away, but actually a million times the size of the earth. ( 地球の 100 万倍、でかい ! ) Even so we can still feel its intense heat. The sun was created out Of the same cloud Of gas and dust that forms the rest 0f the solar system. lts cloud probably comes 仕 om 01d stars that exploded at the end 0f their life as stars sometimes d0. The sun is a very active place. 10 000 mile high jets 0f burning gas called prominences and strange dark patches called sunspots are caused by sun's enormous electromagnetic field. Sunspots as well as Other solar activities seem tO 応Ⅱ OW an eleven-year cycle. The sun's atmosphere or corona can be seen during an eclipse. If you were to go down to the core of the sun, you would experrence 太陽の内部構造 Science 核反応層 光球 放射層 対流層 180