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The snow leopard

T H E S N 0 ′ L E 0 PA R D 191 turns it in his hand, wondermg aloud why fox sign, so abun- dant at Black pond, is uncommon here at lower altitudes. 。 T00 big for fox, I think. As GS speaks, I scan the mountain slopes for bharal: on these rolling hills tO the east Of Somdo, we have not seen even one. Abruptly, he says, 。 HO 旧 it! Freeze! Two snow leopard! " I see a pale shape slip behind a 10W rise patched with snow, as GS, agitated, mutters, "Tail's t00 short! Must have been foxes—! " "No!" I say. "Much t00 big— “・ W01ves! ” he cries out. "Wolves! ” And there they are. Moving away without haste up an open slope beyond the rise, the wolves bring the barren hills t0 life. Two on the slope t0 northward frisk and play, but soon they pause t0 100k us over; their tameness is astonishing. Then they cut across the hill to join three others that are climbing a stone gully. The pack stops each little while t0 gaze at us, and through the telescope we reJ01Ce ln every shining hair: tWO silver 、 MOlves, and t 、 MO Of faded gold, and one that is the no - C010r of frost: this frost- colored wolf, a big male, seems to be the leader. AII have black tail tips and a delicate black fretting on the back. "That's why there's no sign 0f fox or leopard! " GS says, "and that's why the blue sheep stay near the river cliffs, away from this open coun- try! " I ask if the wolves would hunt and kill the fox and leop- ard, and he says they would. For some reason, the wolves' appearance here has taken us by surprise; it is in Tibet that such mythic creatures belong. This is an Asian race Of Ca れな々〃 s , the timber wolf, which both of us have seen in AIaska, and it is always an exciting animal: the empty hills where the pack has gone have come tO life. ln a snow patch are five sets Of wolf tracks, and old wolf scats along the path contain brittle gray stuff and soft yellow hair—blue sheep and marmot. Down the path comes an old woman who has walked alone from Saldang, over the Shey Pass tO the east; we are as sur- prised by her appearance as she is by ours. The 01d woman has seen the five れ g 〃 , and tWO more, but seems less wary Of the WOlves than Of big strangers.

50 Great Short Stories

132 T H 0 M A S W 0 L F E that she was about to see her fib rise ⅲ person before her. On that day, her servant, who was new to the house and neighbourhood, came and told her that a man was asking for her. He wanted, he said, t0 speak t0 Madame. 'What kind ofa man is he?' 'A man ⅲ a blouse. He looked like a country labourer. ' 'Did he give his name?' 'Yes, Madame. ' 'Well, what is it?' 'Putois. ' 'Did he tell you that that was his name?' 'Putois, yes Madame. ' 'And he is here?' 'Yes, Madame. He is waitmg ⅲ the kitchen. ' 'You have seen him?"Yes, Madame. ' 'What does he want?' 'He did not s . He WIII only tell Madame."Go and ask him. ' "When the servant returned to the kitchen, Putois was no longer there. This meeting between PutOis and the new servant was never explained. But I think that 丘 om that day my mother began t0 believe that PutOis might possibly exist, and that per- haps she had not invented. " ONLY THE DEAD KNOW BROOKLYN* BY THOMAS WOLFE ERE'S NO guy livin' dat knows BrookIyn t'roo an' t'roo, because it'd take a guy a lifetime just t0 find his way aroun' duh f town. SO like I say, l'm waitin' for my train t' come when I sees dis big guy standin' deh—dis is duh foist I eveh see ofhim. Well, he's 100k ⅲ ' wild, y'know, an' I can see dat he's had plenty, but still he's holdin' it; he talks good an' is walkin' straight enough. SO den, dis big guy steps up to a little guy dat's standin' deh an' says, "HOW d'yuh get t' Eighteent' Avenoo an' Sixty-sevent' Street?" he says. 丘 om 励 e ル , ′′ andFro 川 De んね MO 川加 g

50 Great Short Stories

414 G E O R G E M I L B U R N He called me aside and t00k me into the filling-station rest- room, and says: "For the love of G04 Dad, take that RO ね button out ofyo 町 coat 1 叩 el , " he says to me. Harry, that come as a big surpnse to me, and I don't mind telling you that itjust about t00k the wind out ofmy sails. But I wasn't going t0 let 0 れ t0 him, so I rared back on my dignity, and says, "Why, what do yo ひ mean, take that Rotary button out ofmy lapel, young man?" I says to him. "Dad; ” Hubert says to me, senous, 'any frat house has al- ways got a few cynics ⅲ it. lfyou was t0 wear that R0tary but- ton in your lapel out tO the frat house, 」 ust as soon as you got out ofsight, some ofthose boys at the house would ra77 the li 危 out ofme," he says. "Hubert," I says, "there's not a thing that this 1 叩 el badge represents that any decent, moral person could afford tO make fun of. If that's the kind of Reds you got out at your fraternity, the kind that would razz a what you might call sacred thing— yes sir, a sacred thing—like ota , well I and yo mamma canjust SO somewheres else and put up. I don't guess the hotels have quit running," I says to him. By now I was on my high horse right, see? "Now, Dad," Hubert says, "it's not that. I mean, person'ly l'm awful proud ofyou. lt's just that I haven't been pledged to this fraternity long, see, and when some Of those older mem- bers found out you was a R0tarian they would deal me a 10t of misery, and I couldn't say nothing. Person'ly I think RO ね is all right," he says to me. "WeII, you better, son," I says, "or l'm going to begin to think that you're sick ⅲ the head. " The way he explained it, though, Harry, that made it a horse of a different tail, as the saying goes, so I give ⅲ and took 0 my RO ね button right there. Stuck it in my pocket, see? SO we went on out and visited at Hubert's fraternity house, and dO you ow that those boysjust got around there and treated we folks like we was pnnces 0fthe b1004. I mean you would ofthought that I was an old ex-graduate ofthat umversity. And we saw the big pigskin tussle the next day, fourteen t0 aught, favor us, and

50 Great Short Stories

T H E G A R D E N PA RT Y An awkward little silence Ⅱ . Mrs. Sheridan fidgeted with her cup. Really, it was very tactless Of father. Suddenly she looked up. There on the table were all those sandwiches, cakes, puffs, all uneaten, all going t0 be wasted. She had one ofher brilliant ideas. 当 know," she said. 、、 Let's make up a basket. Let's send that poor creature some 0f this perfectly good 応 0d. At any rate, it will be the greatest treat for the children. Don't you agree? And she's sure t0 have neighbours calling in and so on. What a point t0 have it all ready prepared. Laura!" She jumped up. 。℃ et me the big basket out 0fthe stairs cupboard. " "But, mother, d0 you really think it's a good idea?" said Laura. Again, how cunous, she seemed t0 be different 仕 om them all. To take scr 叩 s om their party. WouId the poor woman re- ally like that? 、。 Of course! What's the matter with you to-day? An hour or tWO ago you were insisting on us being sympathetic, and Oh, well! Laura ran for the basket. lt was 創 1e4 it was heaped by her mother. "Take it yourself, darling," said she. "Run down just as you are. NO, wait, take the arum lilies t00. People 0f that class are SO impressed by arum lilies. " "The stems will ruin her lace frock," said practical Jose. So they would. Just ⅲ time. "Only the basket, then. And, Laura!"——her mother followed her out ofthe marquee—"don't on any account— "What, mother?" NO, better not put such ideas into the child's head! 。。 NO 市 - ing! Run along. lt was 」 ust growing dusky as Laura shut their garden gates. A big dog ran by like a shadow. The road gleamed white, and down below ⅲ the hollow the little cottages were ⅲ deep shade. HOW quiet it seemed after the afternoon. Here she was gomg down the hill t0 somewhere where a man 1 dead' and she couldn 't realize it. Why couldn 't she? She stopped a minute. And it seemed tO her that kisses, VOIces, tinkling

50 Great Short Stories

T H E A P O S TAT E 413 Because I guess the rest 0fthe boys would suspicion that I was turning highbrow on them. But you've always been a buddy t0 me, Harry, you mangy 01d son ofa hoss thief, you, so what l'm telling you is the straight dope. Harry, like you no doubt remember, up till a few months ago RO ね was about "the most fondest thing I is 0 as the nigger says. There wasn't nothing that stood higher for me than Ro ね . WelI, here, about a year ago last Ⅱ I took a trip down to the university t0 visit my son and go t0 a football game. You know Hubert Junior, my boy.. Sure. WeII, this is his second year down at the university. Yes, that boy is gettmg a college education. I mean, l'm all for youth having a college education. Ofcourse I think there is such a thing as t00 much education workmg a detriment. Take, for instance, some of these long- hairs running around knocking the country right now. But what I mean is, a g004 sound, substantial college education. I don't mean a strmg Of letters a yard long for a man tO write after his J0hn Henry. I just mean that I want my boy to have his sheep- skin, they call it, before he starts out ⅲ the world. Like the 危 1- 10W says, I want him t0 get his A. B. degree, and then he can go out and get his J. 0. B. Now, Harry, I always lt like a father has got certain re- sponsibilities t0 his son. That's just good RO ね . That's all that is. You ow that that's just good Ro ね yourself, Harry. Well, I always wanted Hubert to think about me just like I was a pal to him, or say an older brother, maybe. Hubert always knew that all he had to do was come to me, and I would act like a big buddy to him, irregardless. Well, like I was telling you, H , I started Hubert ⅲ to the university two years ago, and after he had been there about two months, I thought I would run down and see how he was get- ting along and go t0 a football game. SO I and Mrs. T. drove over one Friday. We didn't know the town very well, so we stopped at a filling station, and I gwe Hubert a ring, and he come right on down tO where we was tO shOW us the way. Just as soon as he come up, I could see right then that he had some- thing on his mind bothenng hlm.

50 Great Short Stories

T H E A P 0 S TAT E 417 helping them a little on their frat building fund. There's a fine spirlt 0f fellowshlp ⅲ an orgamzation like that. Some boys 仕 om the best families 0fthe State are members, t00. You might think 仕 om what I said that they'd be uppish, but they're Ⅱ 0t. NO siree. N0t a bit 0f it. I been down there enough for them t0 ow me, now, and they all pound me on the back and call me H. 工 , just like I was one ofthem. And I d0 them, t00. And I no- tice that when they sit down t0 a meal, they have some songs they sing 」 ust as lively and jolly as any we had at R0tary. , Of course, like Hubert said, a few 0f them mght have some wild- haired ideas about R0tary, but they're young yet. And as far as I can see there's not a knocker nor a sourbelly among them. Absolutely democratic. lt puts me ln mind 0f a little incidence that happened last month when the frat threw a big Dad's Day banquet for us down there. AII the fathers 0f the boys om all over the State was there. Well, t0 promote the spirit 0f fellowship between dad and son, the fraternity boys all agreed t0 call their dads by their first name, Just treating their dads like big buddies. SO at the ね b 厄 Hubert happened t0 forget for a minute, and says t0 me "Dad" something. Well sir, the president ofthe frat flashed right out, "AII right, Hubie, we heard you call H. T. 'Dad. ' SO that'll just cost you a dollar for the ice-cream fund. " Ever'b0dY had a good laugh at Hubert getting caught like that, but d0 you know, that boy ofmine just forked right over without making a kick. That shows the s 加仕 , don't it, Harry? N0thing wrong with a boy like that. And the whole bunch is like that, ever' one ofthem. l'll tell you, Harry, the boys at that frat 0f Hubert's are the builders ⅲ the commg generation. Any man ofvision can see that. WeII, that's that. Now what was you going to say?

50 Great Short Stories

G R AV E N I M A G E just sitting down ⅲ a restaurant. He nodded and said, 。、 s , I think I know. You mean the senators. ” "That's right," said the Under Secretary. "l'm not gonna have a cocktail, but you can.... l'll have the lobster. Peas. Shoestnng potatoes.... You want a cocktail?" 当 don't think so. I'II take whatever you're having. 。。 0. K. , waiter?" said the Under Secretary. 。、 Yes, sir," said the captain, and went away. "WeII, CharIes, I was pretty surprised to hear 仕 om yo Ⅱ . 。、 s ゞ ' Browning said, should imagine so, and by the way, I want t0 thank you for answering my letter so promptly. I 朝 OW how rushed you fellows must be, and I thought, as I said ⅲ my letter, at your convemence. 、、 Mm. Well, frankly, there wasn't any use ⅲ putting you 0 圧 I mean till next week or two weeks 伝 om now or anything like that. I could just as easily see you today as a month 丘 om now. Maybe easier. 1 don't know where I'II be likely t0 be a month 仕 om now. ln more ways than one. I may be taking the Clipper t0 London, and then ofcourse I may be out on my can! Coming to New ⅸ and asking 4 for a job. I take it thaft what you wanted tO see me about. ' "Yes, and with hat in hand. ” "Oh, no. I can't see you waiting with hat in hand, not for anybody. N0t even for The Boss. " Browning laughed. "What are you laughing at?" asked the Under Secretary. "WeII, you know how I el about him, so l'd say least of all The Boss. ” 、、 Well, you've got plenty of company in this goddam town. But why'd you come tO me, then? Why didn't you go t0 one 0f your Union League or Junior League or what-ever-the-hell-it- is pals? There, that bigjerk over there with the blue suit and the striped tie, for instance?" Browning looked over at the big jerk with the blue suit and strlped tie, and at that moment their eyes met and the tWO men nodded. "You ow him?" said the Under Secretary. "Sure, I know him, but that doesn't say I 叩 pro 0fhim. '

The snow leopard

NOVEMBER 9 From the path that leads beyond Tsakang, along the precipices of the Black River Canyon, there is a stirring prospect of the great cliffs and escarpments, marching northward toward the point where this Yeju-Kangju flows into the great KarnaIi River. The path is no more than a ledge in many places and, on the northward face Of each ravine, is covered by glare ice and crusted snow. Even on the southward face, the path is narrow, and concentrating hard on every step, I come upon what 100kS like a big pug mark. Because it is faint, and because GS is t00 far ahead tO summon back, and because until now we have found no trace ofleopard, I keep quiet; the mark will be there still when we return. And just at this moment, looking up, I see that GS has paused on the path ahead. When I come up, he points at a distlnct cat scrape and print. The print is faded, but at least we know that the snow leopard is here. Mostly we spend the day apart, meeting over the clay oven for breakfast and supper, but whenever we act like social ani- mals, the impulse has brought luck. A little farther on there is another scrape, and then another, and GS, looking ahead to 、 Mhere the path turns the cliff corner intO the next ravine, says, "There ought tO be a leopard scat out on that next point—it's just the sort 0f place they choose. ' And there it is, all but glow- ing in the path, right beneath the prayer stones 0f the stupa— the Jewel in the Heart of the Lotus, I think, unaccountably, and nod at my friend, impressed. "lsn't that something? " GS says, "To be so delighted with a pile of crap?" He gathers the drop- ping into one 0f the plastic bags that he keeps with him for this purpose and tucks it away intO his rucksack with our lunch.

アメリカの中学教科書で英語を学ぶ

very light, hollow bones. MuscIes are firmly attached t0 bones, and although no trace Of the muscles remains in fossils, the attachment points can be seen on the bones. These tell scientists hOW big the muscles must have been. We know that a bulky digestive system is necessary t0 digest vegetable matter. The herbivores would have had massive barrel-shaped bodies, while carnivores would be slimmer. The sh 叩 e of the teeth tells us what type of 応 od the dinosaur ate. 数 Why did dinosaurs become so successful? The main thing that distinguishes dinosaurs 仕 om other reptiles is the 学 way their b0dy is supported by their legs. The legs 0f ancient and existing reptiles stick out sideways, so the b0dy drags on the ground for most Of the time. lt is raised brlefly when the animal runs. This is very obvious with crocodiles which can run very fast for short distances. The skeletons 0f dinosaurs developed so the legs were beneath the body, raising the whole body 0 仕 the ground. This allowed them tO stand erect and tO walk and run with long strides. These developed predators could run faster than more pri mitive reptiles, which soon became extinct. Were dinosaurs stupid? HOW dO you measure the intelligence Of an extinct animal? What we can say is that the intelligence Of dinosaurs must have been sufficient for their way of life otherwise they would not have survived for millions 0f years. Some plant-eating dinosaurs certainly had very small brains lll proportion tO their size. However, a large brain IS not important in an animal that is tOO enormous tO be attacked and has little to think about 叩 art 仕 om g razing. On the other hand, some 0f the predatory dinosaurs had quite large brains, presumably because they 外 needed t0 think quickly as they pursued their prey. ln companson t0 業 their size, the brains Of the smallest dinosaur predators were the biggest, because they needed t0 be agile and fast moving. 歴史 国語表現 科 201

50 Great Short Stories

T H E C H RY S A N T H E M U M S 341 peared 丘 om his face and eyes the moment his laughing voice ceased. His eyes were dark, and they were 血Ⅱ ofthe brooding that gets ⅲ the eyes 0f teamsters and 0f sailors. The calloused hands he rested on the wire fence were cracked, and every crack was a black line 、 He took offhis battered hat. "l'm 0 my general road, ma'am," he said. "Does this dirt road cut over across the river t0 the LOS Angeles highway?' Elisa stood up and shoved the thick scissors ⅲ her apron pocket. "Well, yes, it does, but it winds around and then fords the river. I don't think your team could pull through the sand. ' He replied with some asperity, "lt might surprise you what them beasts can pull through. ' "When they get started?" she asked. He smiled for a second. "Yes. When they get started. ' "Well," said Elisa, "I think you'll save time ifyou go back to the Salinas road and pick 叩 the highway there. " He drew a big finger down the chicken W1re and made it smg. 当 ain't ⅲ any hurry, ma'am. I go 仕 om Seattle t0 San Diego and back every year. Takes all my time. About six months each way,. I aim t0 応Ⅱ OW mce weather. " Elisa took 0 代 her gloves and stuffed them ⅲ the 叩 ron pocket with the scissors. She touched the under edge 0f her man's hat, searching for fugitive hairs. "That sounds like a nice kind of a way to live," she said. He leaned confidentially over the fence. "Maybe you no- ticed the writmg on my wagon. I mend pots and sharpen knives and scissors. You got any ofthem things t0 d0?" 、。 Oh , no," she said quickly. 、 'Nothing like that. " Her eyes hardened with resistance. "Scissors is the worst thing," he explamed. "Most people just ruin scissors trying tO sharpen 'em, but I know how. I got a specialtool. lt's a little bobbit kind ofthing, and patented. But it sure does the trick. ” 。。 NO. My scissors are all sharp. "AII right, then. Take a pot," he continued earnestly, "a bent pot, or a pot with a hole. I can make it like new SO you don't have tO buy no new ones. That's a savlng for you.